29 responses

  1. Luigi Guarino
    September 6, 2012

    Beautiful maps. Any chance of doing some of plants?

    • Clinton Jenkins
      September 6, 2012

      Luigi,

      We’re working on some data for plants too, but alas they are not as detailed as what can be done with vertebrates. There are about 300,000 plant species compared to 10,000 bird species, and probably not as many people studying them.

      In the near future I do hope to post a more comprehensive look of the world’s biodiversity, both vertebrates and the many other components of life.

      • Luigi
        September 6, 2012

        Thanks for the information, I look forward to seeing the results. What dataset will you use?

      • Roger Harris
        September 7, 2012

        Luigi, Clinton is leaving for Brazil today. I’ll have him contact you as soon as possible. Thank you for your interest!

      • Clinton Jenkins
        September 7, 2012

        It’s some work with a colleague, but I believe the original plant data come out of the Kew Gardens databases, or at least they were a lead in compiling the data from many institutions. We have some ant data too, and those were developed with a lot of people around the world. They were organized here at North Carolina State University by Benoit Guénard and others, although Benoit is now in Japan for a postdoc.

  2. Prasad R Attygalle
    September 8, 2012

    This is very interesting and commendable effort. I have no argument with Clinton for concentrating on the Amazon region since its one of the Mega Diversity regions. I would also like to suggest to have some partners from Indean Sub Continent, Indo-Malayan region (Borneo etc) and African Congoes to cover the other Mega Diversity regions in the World.
    It is quite logical to map the Vertebrate regions and conserve those areas as priority regions since it will cover the test of flora & fauna. Subsequently we could look in to more specific localized regions.
    The commenter is from Sri Lanka

    • Clinton Jenkins
      September 9, 2012

      These maps are being made for the whole world. The Americas were the focus of the first blog post just so that I could be consistent across the maps and keep the posting small. Expect more coverage in the future!

  3. Luciano Lima
    September 11, 2012

    The maps are really nice, but don’t you think that the labels are incorrect? It does not represent “density of ENDEMIC species” it represent “density of species”.

    • Roger Harris
      September 11, 2012

      Thanks Luciano for your sharp eyes! I will check with Clinton. Since I wrote the captions, any error would be mine. – Roger

    • Clinton Jenkins
      September 11, 2012

      Indeed you are correct. We will get that fixed. Maps 1 and 3 are for all species, not just endemics. Maps 4 and 5 show small-ranged / endemic species.

    • Roger Harris
      September 11, 2012

      Luciano, the captions have been corrected. Thank you again for the heads-up!

  4. Peter L
    September 12, 2012

    Really stunning… I find myself really wishing for global endemism maps too. The global density map is great but it really undersells Madagascar, New Guinea, New Zealand etc. in biological importance. Perhaps even some combined endemism X species metric would be a better proxy for “biological importance.”

  5. Sean Anderson
    September 19, 2012

    These are fantastic! Please keep up the great visualization work. Is there any chance we can get access to higher resolution versions for use in lectures? I project my slides on large overhead screens and need high res images for it to look good for my students. Thanks!

    • Roger Harris
      September 19, 2012

      Hello Sean, thank you for your kind words. I am passing your info on to Clinton, and he will be in touch viz. high res images. In the meantime, if you could share this post on Facebook, Twitter, your faculty page or anywhere else, we’d be very grateful!

    • Clinton Jenkins
      September 19, 2012

      Hi Sean,

      We’re working on it. The research and production of the maps is still a work in progress. The goal though is to have plenty of publicly available information to use. Keep an eye on the site and we’ll be posting more as it’s ready.

      Clinton

  6. Sam
    June 28, 2013

    Job well done… Can definitely see a lot of hard work and dedication put into the research… Every individual must understand the seriousness of saving vertebrates around the globe and this is just what we need… Cheers…

    • Clinton
      July 4, 2013

      Thanks Sam. Glad you liked it, and do spread the word. We want to get lots of feedback so that these data and maps can continue to improve.

  7. Chris Canaday
    July 1, 2013

    Great maps, but I would like to ask something. Does the map of bird endemism include the relatively newly divided Tumbesian species of birds? It seems that SW Ecuador and NW Peru should show up as the hottest hotspot, since this is the endemic bird area with the most endemic species.

    Do you happen to know of up-to-date, detailed maps of tropical deforestation that are available on-line? These would also be very important for conservation planning.

    Keep up the good work.

    • Clinton
      July 4, 2013

      Chris,

      The Tumbes region is included in the top 5% of areas for small-ranged bird diversity, although it is not the highest concentration. Areas to the east and so more Andean tend to have higher diversity of small-ranged species. As to the specific species, you’ll need to be more specific on which ones you mean.

      As for deforestation maps, the most recent global that comes to mind are the GlobCover maps (http://due.esrin.esa.int/globcover/). There is also a new high-resolution tree cover dataset by my colleague Joe Sexton at the Global Land Cover Facility (http://landcover.org).

  8. Riley
    July 3, 2013

    Is there any way you could export out a version that’s big enough to print as a poster, or alternatively, just make this available as a poster on Etsy or some photo printing site?

    • Clinton
      July 4, 2013

      Riley, we’re working on it.

  9. Claudio Bohrer
    July 3, 2013

    Dear Clinton
    Congratulations for the work and the beautiful maps. They will help our work for both teaching and influencing decision makers on conservation policies. I also share Luigi´s hope for similar mapping of plant groups, at least for those with more data available. I hope to meet you in the near future in Rio.

    • Clinton
      July 4, 2013

      Thanks Claudio! I share the desire for maps of other taxa. We’ll continue working on it, and I’ll be in Rio this October!

  10. David Zaber
    September 24, 2013

    My dissertation explored the statistical relationships in species diversity (measured solely by richness) across watersheds and landscape units in Michigan, USA. Relationships across commonly used indicator taxa groups were variable across scales, geographic units, and even within watersheds. These results provided strong evidence that the use of indicator species/taxa for management decisions may be sub-optimal given the differences observed across spatial scales and at different levels of data aggregation.

    These maps provide a wonderful tool for identifying hot spots of diversity and will be useful for management decisions. Thanks for posting this.

  11. Clinton Jenkins
    March 5, 2014

    For anyone interested in more maps of biodiversity, including the gis data used in producing them, I launched the new site http://Biodiversitymapping.org

    There you can find many maps for terrestrial vertebrate groups, and in the future other groups of organisms as well.

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